colormelolita:

xxxshakespearexxx:

The Empress of China 武则天 Wu Zetian

Fan Bing Bing 范冰冰 @ Aarif 李治廷

http://www.ancientchinese.net/index.php?topic=1129.0

how can two people be so freaking gorgeous O_O

(via theotherwesley)

fabledquill:

criticizing the catholic church, and particularly the sale of indulgences

image

(via dressthesavage)

femurscourage:

toratiger:

wesley-crusher:

deepspacednine:

likeafieldmouse:

Luis Camnitzer - The Photograph (1981)


The Screenshot (2014)

The Reblog (2014)

Bahahahaha love this

The Unnecessary Comment (2014)

femurscourage:

toratiger:

wesley-crusher:

deepspacednine:

likeafieldmouse:

Luis Camnitzer - The Photograph (1981)

image

The Screenshot (2014)

The Reblog (2014)

Bahahahaha love this

The Unnecessary Comment (2014)

(via theotherwesley)

bewbin:

nasa trying to eat the moon

bewbin:

nasa trying to eat the moon

(via twerquius)

georgetakei:

She just loves this post.
Source: Awwww Pets!

georgetakei:

She just loves this post.

Source: Awwww Pets!

fytortall:

republicansno:

Ok the Magic Steps post I reblogged earlier reminded me of this so I decided to finally make a post about it. 

I hate the new covers for the Song of the Lioness quartet by Tamora Pierce. 

I loathe them. And you may argue that it’s because they aren’t the same as the ones I first fell in love with, but no. I don’t even hate the new Harry Potter covers so out-of-hand as I do these. But look at them:

image

I’m sorry, but there’s no way those are the arms or legs of a girl who’s been training to be a Knight for eight years. Or shoulders or core or anything. Also, if lances were that short IRL your horse would crash into your jousting opponent before your lance came near him or her. Ridiculous. 

Also, the dudes in TWWRLAM. What. 

I don’t think I ever noticed/realized that was a lance on Lioness Rampant.

oh my god

iamscienceside:

musicsigns:

iamscienceside

*scientific meltdown*

iamscienceside:

musicsigns:

iamscienceside

*scientific meltdown*

(via twerquius)

It’s very comforting to think we’ll be able to solve America’s nutrition crisis by building more grocery stores in low-income neighborhoods and educating low-income families on how to cook healthy, nutritious meals.

But the unfortunate truth is that more grocery stores and nutrition education (while helpful to some people) doesn’t address the larger problem — which is that eating is expensive.

According to the Population Reference Bureau, the number of low-income families is increasing. The report defines low-income working families as “those earning less than twice the federal poverty line.”

In 2011, the low-income threshold for a family of four with two children was $45,622. If you estimate rent at $1000/month, which is quite low for a family of four, that leaves about $33,000 for health care, transportation costs, clothing, and groceries for four people. That’s $687.50 per person per month for every single expense except rent.

Let’s do some more math.

Gala apples are among the cheapest fruit nationally. The USDA lists them at $1.16 a pound at the time I’m writing this article. There are about three apples to a pound, so if you wanted to buy your two kids an apple for each day of the week, you would spend $5.80 just on an afternoon snack for your kids. And let’s keep in mind that apples are relatively low-calorie, which means they aren’t very filling.

Six bucks doesn’t seem like much to someone with a middle class salary, but when you’re working with a weekly budget of under $700 per week for everything you need, including car repairs, gas money, winter clothing for constantly growing children, toilet paper, laundry detergent, electric bills… $5.80 starts to look pretty hefty for a snack that won’t even satisfy.

“I look at this list and can’t help but wonder how she’s supposed to do it. If $11 of apples equals two snacks, but $3 in Ramen will feed her entire family for dinner, how can she possibly pick apples with her limited food stamp budget?” McClay wonders.“And how will she ever afford to fill half of every mealtime plate with fruits and veggies, the amount recommended by the same government that issued her food stamps?”

It’s a good question.

The US government heavily subsidizes some foods, such as corn and soybeans. The result is that processed foods that are heavy in these ingredients end up being cheaper than fresh produce, which is not as heavily subsidized, if it is at all.

There is a serious disconnect between what we should be eating to stay healthy, and what the economic reality is.

Why Judging People for Buying Unhealthy Food Is Classist by 

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(via paradife-loft)